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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Kitchen Cabinets for Style Home

You don’t have to buy a whole new set of cabinets to upgrade your kitchen. Sometimes, all it takes is updated hardware, maybe new stain or paint, or even a different door style to give them a whole new look. If you need more space, modifications can be done to what you have such as additional shelves or turntables. If you are buying new, think about all the different items you will have and how much space you will need.

If you want a cozy, warm feeling to your kitchen, you probably want to consider wood options. They are available in a wide variety of wood types such as oak, pine, walnut, cherry and more. You can also choose to stain the wood for added luster and beauty. A painted style can look traditional or contemporary, depending on other features in the design.

You have a wide variety of options when purchasing kitchen cabinets. Many home improvement stores have cabinets on display to give you an idea of how they might look like in your home. Some selections may be in stock and ready for you to take home. Other styles may need to be ordered but are readily available to be shipped to the store or your home. Most of these stores will install your cabinets for a small fee.

There are businesses that specialize in building kitchen cabinets. If you have special needs or want personalized attention, this may be your best bet. Look for a company that has experience, and talk to past customers if you can. The professional staff at these businesses should be able to come to your home and talk with you about options and costs.

Envision what items you will use and how often you will need them. For example, your family will likely use drinking glasses everyday. You don’t want them in a place that is hard to reach or far away from the refrigerator. If you have fine dishes or anything special you want to show, consider putting those items in a cabinet with glass panes. If you have spices, cans or other non-perishable goods to store, one with a turntable may come in handy so you can fit more inside a single space.

Build Retaining Wall

Gather Necessary Materials

To begin creating a retaining wall, you need to first ensure that you have all the necessary materials. For any DIY project, you should purchase safety glasses for eye protection. You will also need a chisel for splitting blocks, wooden stakes, some kind of tool for compacting, and of course, the stones that you are planning to use to build the wall. There are also many other materials that may be needed to complete your project, including brick pavers, aggregate base material, and sand. From there, you’ll need to do some careful measurements to make sure the barrier you are creating will be a snug match for the environment you are planning to build into. It’s good practice to contact your local utility company to ensure there aren’t any utility cables that may be in your way as you are digging into the area where you plan to install your barrier.

Dig & Excavate

When you are creating trenches where the stones will be placed to create the retaining wall, you want to remember that the bottom row of stones or blocks should be buried in the dirt. You should expect the bottom row of stones to be buried under about one inch of dirt for every eight inches you are planning to stack your wall. So, if you are planning a barrier that is two feet high, or 24 inches, you should plan to bury the bottom layer of stones under three inches of dirt. As you are digging, it is important that the trenches are an even level of depth, so that the wall does not become crooked.

Put Retaining Wall in Place

Once the trenches have been dug, you are ready to put the material for the wall in place. To begin, you should insert base material. Base material should not be round, as this can sink into the ground under pressure. You’ll want to use sharp, angular particles that can be broken up and easily spread into the area. You’ll want a four to six inch layer of these smaller pieces and then compact them sturdily. Throughout this process, keep a close eye to ensure the entire structure stays level. This is very important. From there, you can begin laying the stones in an ordered way to build up your wall. Depending on the type of material you use, you may or may not want to use mortar.

Hanging Drywall Alone

Rent a Drywall Lift
Sure, renting a drywall lift does require you to spend some money, but many drywallers recommend this move and claim that it is well worth the cost. A drywall lift is especially handy for lifting up drywall so you can install it on the ceiling, but it works well for walls, too. Just tilt the lift and adjust it to fit 8-foot or 12-foot pieces. You can rent a drywall lift at Home Depot and other home improvement stores for less than $100 a day. It’s better than injuring your back.

Get a Panel Roller
If you have a large job, it can be difficult to move dozens of drywall panels around by hand from one place to another. A panel roller can carry two panels at a time and is easy to operate. You can even control the panel roller with one hand while carrying a sheet of drywall tucked under your other arm. You can find one at your local home improvement store.

Use a Lever
When installing drywall on the lower parts of the wall, you may be tempted to strain in order to keep the panels off the ground. Instead, use a pry bar and a wood block to act as a lever. You can then use foot power to ensure a tight fit against the upper panel.

Use Your Head (Literally)
When nailing drywall onto a ceiling, use your head as support. Preset the nails while you’re on the ground, then lift up the sheet, support it with your head and then drive in the nails.

Cut Loose
When working alone, you need to save as much time as possible. Measure loosely by subtracting ΒΌ in. from the measurements. It’s better to have panels that are too short than too long because you can always use joint compound to fill in the gaps. If the panels are too long, you may be able to get it to work, but it’s going to be a struggle. You’ll end up having to take down the board and re-cut it.

Damp Proofing Solutions

The most common areas in the building that will get affected is the basement, wood, unused rooms and the external walls. The basement should be regularly checked as it is below the surface and is a breeding ground for all kinds of germs. A good solution to this is to look into a basement waterproofing solution to avoid such problems as there is several solutions available or even look into converting your basement into another living area of the house which will also add value to the property.

It’s such a shame to see your cellar go to waste if you are not making any use of it when it’s just looking so sad and crying out to be giving a face lift. You only have to way the pro’s and the con’s and you will work out that the pro’s will always out way because it’s so cost-effective to get your cellar damp proofed.

The other services that is often provided by most professional companies is wet rot, dry rot and wood-worm so if you think you might have some kind of wood rot or dry rot issue in your premises then look into one of the solutions such as an all-purpose fungicide spray or improving the sub floor ventilation.